social media

2015 Nonprofit Communication Trends Report [Infographic]

Recently the team from NonprofitMarketingGuide published the 2015 Nonprofit Communication Trends Report, and it’s packed with some really interesting insights!

  • This is the first year that community engagement and donor retention have surpassed priority in acquiring new donors.
  • Nonprofit websites and email marketing are still the most important communication channels which hasn’t changed in the last year.
  • The biggest challenges are not enough time to create quality content and a lack of budget.

Check out the rest of the infographic below for insights on how to help your nonprofit’s communication in 2015!

nonprofit communication trends

Source: http://www.nonprofitmarketingguide.com/resources/2015-nonprofit-communications-trends-report/

Joel Widmer is the Founder and President of Fluxe Digital Marketing.

SEE ALSO:

Burnout by Rob Fitzpatrick

How To Evaluate Nonprofit Marketing Opportunities by Joel Widmer

free images for nonoprofits
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Where To Find Great Free Pictures For Your Nonprofit Blog

Here’s my secret stash of completely free photos for the taking. They don’t have any copyrights so you don’t have to worry about anyone coming after you. Just download and use them on your blog, email, website, marketing collateral or anywhere else!

Each site is updated with new photos daily : )

http://www.pexels.com/ – Searches multiple free stock photo sites

http://thestocks.im/ – Also aggregates multiple free photo sites

http://pixabay.com/ – You have to register but all photos are free to use and great selection

https://stocksnap.io/ – Free photo aggregator site. Hundreds of new photos added daily!

http://smartphotostock.com/ – Variety of different photos sorted by tags, which makes it easy to find them!

One last tip! Most of these photos are high resolution and therefore very large. If you want to reduce the size of the image so it does not take up so much space on your website, use this free compressor tool that will reduce it to a fraction of the size without compromising quality: https://compressor.io/

by Joel Widmer

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Meet The App That Donates Every Time You Hit Snooze

Looking for a new way to increase donations?

Icukoo is a new alarm clock app that donates to a charity every time you hit the snooze button. If you snooze the alarm the app takes note. When your snoozes have added up to a set amount, the app will send a text asking if you want to donate that amount or let more snoozes accrue.

Here’s how it works (from their website):

a. Set the iCukoo alarm.
b. Select the charity you want to support.
c. Decide how much each snooze is worth.

Right now it’s only available to a select amount of charities but hopefully it’ll open to more soon. You can check out the iCukoo website for more information.

icukoo2

 

3 Excellent Nonprofit Facebook Pages You Can Learn From

 

nonprofit fb pages

Keeping up a nonprofit Facebook page is tough. It’s fun and easy at first, but when the ideas run out and you’re unsure what to do next, it quickly becomes a grind.

A great way to discover new concepts is to look at what others are doing. Keep an eye on other nonprofits to see what is getting engagement and what you can try with your audience. Remember, you don’t have to do this on your own. When you can’t think of what to post next, that little spark is often just what you need.

Here are 3 great Facebook pages that are creating good content and engaging their donors. Check them out and see what resonates with you!

Christian Care Ministry

https://www.facebook.com/MyChristianCare

From their about page:

Christian Care Ministry provides a variety of programs to serve and connect the Christian community, including Medi-Share, Manna, Restore and Healthy Church.

christian care ministry

Why we like them:

  • The top banner gets you involved immediately with what is happening for the Christian care ministry.
  • There are lots of visuals, like Bible verses and quotes, that people can easily engage with.
  • They do a good job of incorporating hashtags into their posts.
  • They keep their audience engaged with quizzes, contests and fill in the blanks.

Show Hope

https://www.facebook.com/ShowHope

From their about page:

Show Hope exists to mobilize individuals and communities to join God’s revolution to care for orphans in their distress, helping to provide waiting children with food, shelter, medical care and forever families.

show hope

Why we like them:

  • Show Hope has a lot of great extra tabs like events, blog posts and email signups. (Though we do wish they kept them a little more up to date!)
  • They do a great job of keeping people informed through their blog posts on Facebook.
  • Their pictures are formatted perfectly for Facebook posts.
  • They do an excellent job of staying engaged, responding to questions and comments in the newsfeed.

charity: water

https://www.facebook.com/charitywater

From their about page:

charity: water is working every day to reinvent charity while bringing clean drinking water to the 748 million people living without.

charity:water

Why we like them:

  • The photography immediately catches your eye. Their photographs draw you in and make you want to read about them, and they do a good job of describing them simply.
  • The tone of voice for charity: water is very personal. When you scroll through their timeline you’ll notice specific stories about many of their members and sponsors.
  • They also feature some of the wackier ways people have raised money which is entertaining and thought-provoking. (One guy raised money by listening to Nickelback for 168 hours and a vegetarian promised to eat a hamburger if she raised $10,000).
  • They’ve done a great job with reviews on Facebook. Facebook reviews have grown in importance and with over 786 reviews and an average rating of 4.8, they not only have great social proof, but also dozens of testimonials from their sponsors.

Bonus tip!

Take advantage of the follow feature on Facebook’s insights page. You can follow several other pages to see what they are doing and how they are growing. Use those pages to get ideas for engaging posts and keep tabs on pages you want to engage with.

4 Ways Your Nonprofit Should Respond to Facebook’s News Feed Changes

4 Ways Facebook Changes Ries Bar StoolIn January, Facebook will begin limiting the number of promotional posts people see

in their feed from Pages. This won’t reduce the number of ads people see; just what

Facebook deems as overly promotional posts – that aren’t paid posts.

“The idea is to increase the relevance and quality of the overall stories — including

Page posts — people see in their News Feeds,” said Facebook on their blog.

Facebook defines promotional content as:

1. Posts that solely push people to buy a product or install an app

2. Posts that push people to enter promotions and sweepstakes with no real

context

3. Posts that reuse the exact same content from ads

This comes on the heels of several Facebook news feed changes that may are

pointing to the demise of organic reach on Facebook. How does this change my

nonprofit’s Facebook strategy? What tactics can I use to respond to these changes? Read More

NBB 30 minutes social media
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How To Manage Your Nonprofit’s Social Media in 30 Minutes a Day

If you groan every time you see social media on your to-do list because the time commitment seems unbearable, this post is for you.

Social media doesn’t need to take up a lot of your time. If you plan your content using a monthly content calendar, you can keep your audience engaged with just a few minutes per day. By spending a little time in between projects to check social networks, you can have them easily under control.

But there’s a catch. (There’s always a catch!)

You’ve gotta have a plan.

Why? Because “checking” Facebook leads to the one thing Facebook is best at: wasting time. Before you know it, the day’s half over and you’ve missed lunch.

Here’s an example schedule for keeping up with your social networks throughout the day. You can schedule your social media at whatever time works best for you. The times next to each one are just meant to demonstrate a sample schedule.

One other thing to keep in mind: this schedule can change depending on what social channel is dominant for you. For example, your nonprofit might be the most active on Facebook and not have a presence on Twitter. So instead of spending 15 minutes on Twitter, I might put the extra time into responding to comments on Facebook and creating new content.

Alter the schedule to fit your situation.

BLOG | 8:00 – 8:04am

  • 4 minutes: Respond to any comments

FACEBOOK | 9:00 – 9:06

  • 3 minutes: Write one status update
  • 3 minutes: Read and respond to any comments on your page from the day before

TWITTER | 10:30 – 10:45

  • 2 minutes: Write one tweet
  • 3 minutes: Read and respond to @replies
  • 3 minutes: Read your tweetstream and keyword searches. Respond to relevant content in your timeline if you have something good to say back.
  • 3 minutes: Retweet something that you think your followers would benefit from hearing
  • 2 minutes: Follow back relevant people who have followed you
  • 2 minutes: Write another tweet to schedule for later

YOUTUBE | 12:05 – 12:10

  • 2 minutes: Respond to any comments on your wall
  • 3 minutes: Comment on someone else’s video

Great! We’ve got the daily content down. Now let’s look at the weekly and monthly plan.  Some things we don’t need to do every day, so we assign them to the beginning or end of the week and month. Here are a few examples to get you started.

Weekly Tactics

  • At the beginning of the week, check that your content is loaded to your blog and/or Youtube and scheduled to be published.
  • Write social media updates for each post to promote them and schedule them in Hootsuite.

Monthly Tactics

  • Create an analytics report for each of your channels.
  • Brainstorm blog topics for next month, and start creating outlines for each post. Set due dates for each one.

Use this list as a starting point to figure out your daily, weekly, and monthly tactics, and take the guesswork out of your nonprofit’s social media!

Smartphone Interview Tips- Part 1

Screen shot 2014-09-05 at 2.51.18 PMWith smartphones, we now have mobile TV studios in our hands. We can interview friends and family, and more importantly for nonprofits, donors, volunteers, clients and more. Personally, I’ve done studio interviews with folks like Olympian Scott Hamilton, author and survivor Elizabeth Smart, business guru Pat Lencioni, and even NASCAR legend Darrell Waltrip. I’ve taken some of the lessons I’ve learned along the way and I’m sharing them with you here, with the help of fellow NBBer and nonprofit activist Leah Hayes.

In part 1, we’ll focus on questions like:
-What is the single most important thing to remember when interviewing someone?
-Is too close for comfort just right?
-Where should you look when you’re giving an interview?
-How do you make the interviewee the star?

NEXT, WATCH SHANNON LITTON- SHOULD NON PROFITS FOCUS ON THE HOW OR THE WHY?

blogging-frequency
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How Often Should You Update Your Nonprofit’s Blog?

If you ask five people the question, how often should I post my blog, you will undoubtedly get five different answers.

In this post, I don’t want to give you another answer, I want to give you a framework for figuring out how often your nonprofit should blog once and for all.

But first,  let’s look at the question “how often should I blog” a different way. In order to figure this out we need to what know the goal of your blog is.

Is it to attract new donors?

Is it to keep your audience up to date?

Is it to grow your email list?

Or all of the above?

First, you MUST know what you are trying to accomplish through your blog. The next step is asking two simple questions: Who am I trying to reach? And what can I realistically make time for? Read More

Two Easy Ways To Make Cool, Sharable Graphics

TorresReisSocial media has tremendous upside. But it sure eats up a ton of content! One of the biggest challenges we face as non-profit marketers is how do we effectively communicate in the social media space and balance the content demands. When so much of social is visual, how do you create great looking graphics and social media shareables without constantly sending work to a designer?

One of my favorite iPhone apps is WordSwag. WordSwag allows you to create quick and great looking shareable graphics, all you need is a quote. For example, Beth Torres, CEO of Make A Wish Middle Tennessee, recently spoke at our @NonBoardBoard meeting and many of her quotes struck me, here’s one that I created a shareable from in about 30 seconds:

Read More


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