leadership

Working With Corporations Beyond Money- Jen Knickerbocker

Screen Shot 2016-05-23 at 8.02.10 AMWe’re excited to announce Jen Knickerbocker as NonBoardBoard’s speaker for June 10. Per Forbes, Jen Knickerbocker “has been instrumental in orchestrating more than $100 million in pro bono services for organizations”.  If there is anyone who knows how to help nonprofits work with businesses for pro bono services, it’s Jen.

Jen is a great role model as a successful business woman (Partner at Deloitte), wife & mom (even adopting!), triathlete (she destroys NonBoardBoard founder Brian Lord at every race), and community leader (on the board of the Brentwood Family YMCA and Crosspoint Church).

Here are several national articles by Jen or in which Jen is quoted in Forbes or Fortune:

Jen “has been instrumental in orchestrating more than $100 million in pro bono services for organizations”- Click here for more.

Women who do this are less likely to get ahead– Jen’s article on Fortune.com:

Forbes interviewed Jen on altruistic leadership

Forbes interviewed Jen on the skill to make you more credible

Details:
7:55AM to 9AM, 109 International Drive, Franklin, TN (Cool Springs, near Wild Ginger, Taste of India). Networking 20 minutes before and after. Brian Lord’s cell for last minute directions- 615-516-7643.  Remember to budget time for traffic.

What to wear? Anything from a suit to flip flops, it’s up to you!

Attachment-Based Leadership-Part II

Attachment Based Leadership Promo PicIn the previous blog, Attachment Leadership (Part 1), we introduced the 4 S’s of attachment and began to explore how these can be applicable to the workplace. The 4 S’s defined were:

  • Seen– not just seeing with the eyes, but perceiving another deeply and empathetically
  • Safe- avoiding actions and responses that would frighten or hurt the person we are in relationship with
  • Soothed– helping the other person to deal with difficult emotions and situations
  • Secure– helping the other person cultivate an internalized sense of well-being

This language may be very foreign in many business settings. These words may not be built into the company culture. However, there are practical ways to begin to “live out” these concepts and foster an attachment-based leadership culture. Here are a few tips for getting started:

Read More

Attachment-Based Leadership-Part 1- Amy Alexander

Screen shot 2014-10-27 at 11.05.11 AMWhen you hear the word “attachment,” what comes to mind and what does it mean to you? Does your mind go to ideas related to having an infant? Perhaps you have visions of “baby-wearing,” “co-sleeping,” “breast-feeding on demand,” “responsiveness to crying” etc. Or, did you mind go toward relationships, recalling the Tom Cruise quote from Jerry Maguire, “You complete me.” This idea is one that suggests attachment means an inability to live without the other person –   “I cannot live without you. I would simply die if you weren’t in my life.”

You are not alone if you share the above first reactions upon hearing “attachment.” Read More

Should You Consider Arbitration?

Screen shot 2013-08-07 at 5.31.52 PMIn a perfect world, executive directors and boards would always be on the same page, but serious differences can arise, and sometimes the best way to find reconciliation is through third-party mediation.  A breakdown in communication and trust can lead to feelings of desperation, frustration and helplessness. “Score-keeping” is not healthy in any relationship. At that point, or sooner, someone neutral needs to go in and help both sides focus on the future.

Through mediation, the board/board chair and an executive director can agree to set new rules, new clear expectations and discuss what they need from each other to be successful and ultimately set the terms for mutual benefit.  It’s partially a Personal Improvement Plan and partially strategic planning.  The goal is to strengthen the organization– it isn’t personal.

The most delicate relationship a CEO or Executive Director has is the one with his board.  The board is responsible for ensuring sustainability for the organization.  The challenging part is with each change in board leadership, there is a shift in how the organization runs.  The staff must adjust.  The part no one wants to talk about is this- if the personalities clash, the board is ultimately responsible for making the decisions.  This relationship has to be approached the same way you approach a boss in Corporate America.  The board is the boss……… it’s part of the ego-check.  It can be hard for staff to admit because we are in it everyday, but this is the current structure of nonprofit organizations.    Mediation may be the last option, but we must always remember it is an option.

– Beth Torres is the President/CEO of Make-A-Wish Middle Tennessee, and former Junior Achievement VP and Reebok Marketing Manager.  She can be followed on twitter @_beth_torres

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